Life-changing experience for Media Production learners

Learners enjoyed a “life-changing” experience at a spectacular showcase event which demonstrated their skills in digital video production.

A dozen Level 3 Creative Media Production learners attended the Skills Show, which took place at The NEC in Birmingham between November 16 and 18.

The event, which is the nation’s largest for skills and careers, helps to shape the future of a new generation by helping young people to go further, faster in their careers.

After a competitive bidding process, the production team, known as Estuary Student TV (ESTV), were among those from the Institute chosen to host a showcase for other young people, their parents and educators.

Setting up a green screen, learners invited members of the public to try reading the autocue, which they said went down “really well”.

“It was something new to us but we really enjoyed it, and there was a massive queue of people wanting to have a go,” said Matt Boot (16).

Jayden Gollings (18) added: “It was great being thrown in at the deep end and having to sort ourselves out. We all learned a lot from the experience.”

Ewan Jones (19) said it was a “great bonding experience”, commenting: “I enjoyed talking to young students wanting to go to college and learn about the industry a bit more.”

Media curriculum manager Tom Hughes said he was “really proud” of what his learners had achieved.

“10 of the 12 learners only started in September, so this is their first hands-on experience.

“It’s given them confidence by demonstrating what they do, talking to the public and working as a team.

“They totally ran the show, to the point where the three staff members took a step back and let them manage the whole thing.

“They had no issue with speaking to people and letting them come on set so it was quite a proud moment for staff.”

He added: “We see World Skills as one of our ‘life changers’, as part of our faculty vision.

“It puts students in a completely new environment, in a huge exhibition centre with around 100,000 people, and it’s down to them to step up and do what they do.”